10 Things to Know about Typhoon Season in Japan

Typhoon season in Japan is unfortunately here. Are you not quite familiar with typhoons in Japan? Are you not sure what you need to prepare before, during and after the tragic weather event? Let Smiles help guide you and help you answer questions that you may have related to typhoons in Japan.

10 Things to Know about Typhoon Season in Japan

Table of Contents

1. What are typhoons like in Japan?

Typhoons in Japan can vary. Some can be very small where they bring in rain clouds just like a normal rainy day and the wind is not strong enough to bend your umbrella. Others, on the other hand, can be extremely destructive to the point the strong wind and rain can rip roofs or sidings off of buildings, cause objects as large as cars to get carried away in the air and even cause major landslides in mountainous areas. In some cases, multiple typhoons can combine into one creating a joint typhoon which can be more detrimental. To learn more about typhoons in Japan, click here.

rain atul-vinayak
Photo by Atul Vinayak

2. When does the typhoon season in Japan occur?

Typhoons can come and go in between the months of July and October.

3. Where can I see the latest news on typhoons in Japan?

4. What should I do before a typhoon hits my area? How should I prepare for a typhoon?

  • Make sure you prepare an emergency kit in case you’re asked to evacuate your area and mainly include the items listed below:
    • Phone and charger
    • Non-perishable food (e.g., canned goods)
    • Extra outfit and rain gear
    • Cash and/or cards
    • Flashlight
  • Or if you want to purchase an emergency kit online, check out the one below
  • Charge any important electronics in case you have a power outage
  • If you have window shutters, please use them to shield them from objects that could break your windows
  • Tie or weigh anything down that you would think could fly into the air if the winds become aggressive
  • Make sure you keep your ID cards, passport and other important documents somewhere safe and with you in case you’re informed to evacuate

5. What should I do during a typhoon in Japan?

  • If you’re a student or traveling employee, check to see if your school or place of work are closed due to the weather conditions
  • Stay inside as many stores and shopping areas may shorten their business hours if typhoon conditions seem to worsen

6. If I need to ride the train during a typhoon, what should I do?

Try to refrain from riding the trains as certain/most lines as they could be stopped for a long period of time. However, if you need to check the details and updates on trains in Japan, you can check on their websites. Below are some sites we’ve found and would like to share with you:

7. How do I know if a typhoon is coming?

Usually, if a typhoon in Japan is approaching, your embassy should send you an email notification. If you want to check online, you can visit Japanese Meteorological Agency’s website.

8. How do I know if my area in Japan is at risk during a typhoon?

To see the level of risk your area may have during a typhoon (or if a tsunami hits) in Japan, there are sites that provide charts. They’re usually in Japanese, but the colors they utilize in the charts are easy to understand (red=high risk; yellow=low risk). To see the level of risk your area may have, click here (in Japanese).

hazard map of tokyo
Example of hazard map of Tokyo

9. Are there any English apps that have information for typhoons and other natural disasters in Japan?

10. What are other things I should know about the typhoon season in Japan?

In the event that you’re experiencing a natural disaster that causes the phone data connection to weaken, you may have access to FREE Wi-Fi depending on where you are located. If you’re in a more populated area like a large station or shopping mall, look for a Wi-Fi network called “00000JAPAN”. It’s open to the public.

Typhoon season in Japan is here and it’s always important to be prepared for it. We hope that this blog helped provide you the information you need in case there’s a typhoon warning in your area. If there are other tips you’d like to share, please feel free to let us know.

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